Raster To Vector ConversionCorporate Identity Design Logo Design Samples TestimonialsDiscount Printing
LogoSharx Special Offers
Custom Logo Design
Logosharx HomeLogo Design FAQsLogo Design Linkslogo design services Logo Design TipsLogo Design OfferLogosharx Contacts
 Logo Design HomeLogo Design SamplesCustom Logo DesignCorporate Identity PackagesLogo Design ProcessLogosharx ContactsOrder Logo Design100% Satisfaction Guarantee

logo design tips

Logo Strategies: Types of Logos

 

Wordmark Logo
The most widely used of all logo types, the wordmark focuses on text and typeface but can incorporate other elements as well. A wordmark may be best suited for companies whose name effectively describes what they do (Office Max, Home Depot) WIthout graphical elements to convey that message, a literal interpretation of the words is often necessary. (For example, we know that Gilmore & Rey are accountants because the logo literally tells us so.) 

A wordmark is often text only with unique typographic treatments (Microsoft, Sears, Yahoo). Most often however, the company name is incorporated together with simple graphic elements to create a clean, simple identity. The representation of the word essentially becomes a symbol of the company. See Typographic Considerations for more information.

Choose a wordmark when:
• Communication funds are limited and should be focused on name recognition.
• Your name is reasonably distinctive but not (yet) a household word.
• You want to associate products or subsidiaries with the parent more clearly and directly than a symbol permits.

Lettermark Logo
Similar to a wordmark, a lettermark is a wholly typographic mark, usually involving initials or abbreviations. Monograms and anagrams are lettermarks. The representation of the letter(s) essentially become a symbol of the company. See Typographic Considerations for more information.

You should consider a lettermark logotype only when:
• Your initials translate graphically better than your actual name.
• You need to link subsidiaries to the parent and can’t easily use the name.
• You can afford to teach the public what the lettermark means.

Brandmark Symbol
A simple but strong graphic symbol, often abstract, that complements an aspect of a business or service and represents a company by association. (Think of NIKE or Apple Computer.)

You should consider a symbol only when:
• You need an emblem on a product.
• Your name is too long, too generic, doesn’t translate well globally, or has no personality.
• You need to link subsidiaries to the parent and can’t easily use the name.
• You can afford to teach the public what the symbol means.

 

Iconic Logotype
Iconic logotypes are also referred to as combination marks. An iconic logotype generally combines a brandmark symbol with a wordmark. The combination can be loose or integral (as in the Jesters logo above) .  With a loose combination, the elements can be used together or seperately. A well designed iconic logotype can communicate what a company does as well as reflect the company personality.

Since Iconic Logotypes communicate more readily than other logotypes, less marketing is required for the logo to be effective. Therefore, iconic logotypes are the most cost effective type of logo design available and are ideal for statups or small businesses with limited marketing budgets.

Choose an iconic logotype when:
• You are a startup enterprise or small business with limited funds.
• Your name is reasonably distinctive but not (yet) a household word.
• You need an emblem on a product, but want more than just a symbol.

 

 

LogoSharx logo design Copyrightlogo design privacylogo design terms
 

 

Logo Design 2003 by LogoSharx Logo Design. All Rights Reserved